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The Tron Kirk

The Tron Kirk, or Christ’s Kirk at the Tron, has stood in the heart of Edinburgh’s Old Town for almost 400 years.

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St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral

Sir George Gilbert Scott's medieval gothic Cathedral, with a large central tower and spire.

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Well Court

Picturesque four and five storey tenement flats enclose a communal courtyard next to the Water of Leith.

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5 Charlotte Square

5 Charlotte Square was the birthplace in 1797 of Elizabeth Grant, who wrote The Memoirs of a Highland Lady, regarded as a classic of Scottish literature. They give an insight into both Georgian high society life and the early history of No.5.

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Assembly Rooms

The Assembly Rooms was built between 1783 and 1787 to provide a place of entertainment for the wealthy residents of the New Town. Over 200 years later, it still retains its function as a venue for music and dance.

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The Melville Monument

The Melville Monument in St Andrew Square is one of the most prominent landmarks in the city.

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36 St Andrews Sq

The grandest house in the New Town?

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General Register House

General Register House on Princes Street is one of the world’s oldest custom-built archive buildings still in use.

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Nelson Monument

A monument was built to commemorate Admiral Lord Nelson

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National Monument

A monument to commemorate Scots who had died in the Napoleonic Wars

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Beehive Inn

The Beehive Inn in the Grassmarket is one of Edinburgh’s oldest public houses, and incorporates a grim reminder of the city’s past.

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Riddles Court

An architectural gem with a distinguished history, playing host to a royal banquet in 1598 and becoming the residence of David Hume in 1751.

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James Court

James Court has a special place in Edinburgh’s history, as it is connected to several of the most important figures in the city’s past.

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Milne's Court

From the Lawnmarket, Milne’s Court is well-hidden and the only clues are a small sign above the entrance to the pend, and the date 1690 carved into the stonework.

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Writers' Museum, Lady Stair's House

Lady Stair’s House, home to the Writers' Museum, lies just off the Lawnmarket, a location favoured by tourists as a picturesque piece of Old Edinburgh.

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Morocco’s Land

A memento of exile

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John Knox House

One of the oldest houses in Edinburgh, but probably not the home of the firebrand preecher

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Tweedale Court

An architectural detective story tucked away off the Royal Mile (Image via VisitScotland)

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Moray House

A spectacular Canongate residence, once the scene of a great political drama

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Canongate Tolbooth

Every Scottish burgh possessed a tollbooth, which acted as a courthouse, prison, meeting place and the means to collect tolls from travellers entering the town. Today Canongate Tolbooth houses the People's Story Museum.

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Museum of Edinburgh

Discover Edinburgh’s fascinating history through the Museum of Edinburgh’s wide and varied collections. In exploring the Museum’s maze of 16th century buildings, you will see iconic items, beautiful objects and learn fascinating facts and gruesome tales.

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Acheson House

Originally a grand Canongate residence, then by turns brothel, slum, and now home to Edinburgh World Heritage.

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Queensberry House

A 17th century 'grand lodging', now part of the Scottish Parliament.

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White Horse Close

White Horse Close takes its name from an inn that used to stand at its north end. Journeys to London would start from its courtyard. The close was also once home to William Dick who founded the Royal School of Veterinary Studies.

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Old College

A masterpiece by Robert Adam and William Playfair, perhaps the University's most important ensemble of buildings.

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Teviot Row House

A much-loved student landmark.

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George Square

The leafy and bustling square at the heart of the University of Edinburgh

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Explore the Old and New Towns of Edinburgh

The Old and New Towns of Edinburgh are one of the most beautiful cityscapes in the world, inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1995. The unique character of the city comes from the striking contrast between the medieval Old Town and the Georgian New Town, with each area containing many significant historic buildings. Use the interactive map above, or find our historical maps. Another good starting place for getting to know the World Heritage Site is our new exhibition at the Tron.

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